What is Green Coffee Bean Uses and Benefits?

Green coffee extract is a supplement and food product derived from green coffee beans. The difference between green coffee beans and regular coffee beans is simple: coffee beans are naturally green, and turn brown when they are roasted. Roasting the coffee beans removes most of the active ingredient in green coffee bean extract: a molecule known as chlorogenic acid.

Supplementing with chlorogenic acid may have the same effects as using green coffee extract; however, research seems to support that chlorogenic acid is better absorbed through green coffee extract than on its own.

Benefits of Green Coffee Bean

Green coffee bean is promising as an energy supplement. There are two active ingredients in green coffee bean extract: caffeine and chlorogenic acid. Caffeine is a well-known and well-researched metabolism and energy booster. The combination of these two ingredients is much more effective than caffeine (or regular coffee) alone.

Weight Loss

Clinical research suggests that green coffee extract may help with weight loss. Adults with mild to moderate obesity who consume green coffee extract lost significantly more weight than those consuming regular coffee.

Obesity

Obesity can be influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. The prevalence of obesity has largely increased over the past few decades due to lifestyle shifts. Obesity is clinically diagnosed as having a BMI of over 30, and usually is accompanied by any number of detrimental health conditions. It is an increasingly common condition that currently affects more than 30% of the population, with over 50% of Americans considered to be either overweight or obese.

Hypertension

There is preliminary clinical evidence that supports the role of green coffee extract in significantly reducing blood pressure in adults with mild, untreated hypertension. Blood pressure is the force of the blood pumping against the artery walls. With high blood pressure, repeated stress on the artery wall can cause damage and health problems such as heart disease. About 29% of adults in the US have high blood pressure. Other traits that green coffee extract may be beneficial towards include: hyperhomocysteinemia and metabolic rate.

what is green coffee extract

Sources of Green Coffee Bean

Green coffee beans are actually grown on a bush, usually in warm or tropical regions. The vast majority of coffee beans available in the US are already roasted – which means they are no longer the green coffee beans used for supplementation. Green coffee beans are available in raw, unprocessed form or as an extract in supplement (capsule) form.

Do I Need A Green Coffee Bean Supplement?

Since green coffee bean is not necessary for human bodily functions, supplementation is never absolutely necessary.  Can you benefit from green coffee bean supplementation? If you are overweight, obese, or have hypertension, you may experience positive health benefits from green coffee bean.

How Much Green Coffee Bean Do I Need?

There is no RDA (recommended daily amount) for green coffee beans or its extract. Green coffee bean supplements are also available in a variety of chlorogenic acid strengths, as well as the option of additional caffeine. The optimal dosages for chlorogenic acid and/or green coffee bean extract have not yet been determined. However, effective and safe dosages based on available research is as follows:

  1. 10% Chlorogenic Acid Supplement: 1200-3000mg daily
  2. 20% Chlorogenic Acid Supplement: 600-1500mg daily
  3. 50% Chlorogenic Acid Supplement: 240-600mg daily

What are the side effects of Green Coffee Bean?

Green coffee bean extract is generally well tolerated, and mild side effects are usually associated with caffeine. These side effects include headache, diuresis (excess urine production), anxiety, insomnia, and agitation. Research has not yet evaluated the safety and effectiveness of green coffee bean during pregnancy, so do not use while pregnant.

Are There Any Medications or Supplements I Shouldn’t Take With Green Coffee Bean?

Known interactions with green coffee bean extract are related mostly to its caffeine content. There are some green coffee bean extract supplements that have additional caffeine added to them, so they are more likely to cause an interaction. Specific interactions with chlorogenic acid are not as well known or documented at this time.

Alendronate (Fosamax)

  1. Coffee reduces alendronate bioavailability by 60% in humans.
  2. Separate coffee ingestion, including green coffee, and alendronate administration by two hours.

Antihypertensive Drugs

  1. Clinical studies have shown that green coffee extract decreases blood pressure. When used with antihypertensive drugs, green coffee might have additive blood pressure-lowering effects; use with caution.

Adenosine (Adenocard)

  1. The caffeine in green coffee is a competitive inhibitor of adenosine at the cellular level. However, caffeine doesn’t seem to affect supplemental adenosine because high interstitial levels of adenosine overcome the antagonistic effects of caffeine.
  2. It is recommended that methylxanthines and methylxanthine-containing products be stopped 24 hours prior to pharmacological stress tests. However, methylxanthines appear more likely to interfere with dipyridamole (Persantine) than adenosine-induced stress testing.

Antidiabetes Drugs

  1. Theoretically, use of green coffee and diabetes drugs at the same time might interfere with blood glucose control due to the caffeine in coffee.
  2. In clinical research, green coffee extract (Svetol, Naturex, South Hackensack, NJ), either alone or in combination with caffeine (CoffeeSlender, Med-Eq Ltd, Tonsberg, Norway) resulted in modest reductions in blood glucose levels in healthy individuals. However, other reports claim that caffeine might increase or decrease blood sugar.

Cimetidine (Tagamet)

  1. Theoretically, concomitant use might increase serum caffeine concentrations and the risk of adverse effects, due to the caffeine contained in green coffee. Cimetidine decreases the rate of caffeine clearance by 30% in humans.

Clozapine (Clozaril)

  1. Theoretically, co-administration might acutely exacerbate psychotic symptoms, due to the caffeine contained in green coffee. Caffeine can increase the effects and toxicity of clozapine. Caffeine doses of 400-1000 mg per day inhibit clozapine metabolism in humans.
  2. Clozapine is metabolized by cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2). Researchers speculate that caffeine might inhibit CYP1A2. But there is no reliable evidence that caffeine affects CYP1A2. There is also speculation that genetic factors might make some patients be more sensitive to the interaction between clozapine and caffeine.

Contraceptive Drugs

  1. Theoretically, concomitant use might increase caffeine concentrations and the risk adverse effects, due to the caffeine contained in green coffee. Oral contraceptives decrease the rate of caffeine clearance by 40% to 65% in humans.

Dipyridamole (Persantine)

  1. The caffeine in green coffee inhibits dipyridamole-induced vasodilation (human research). It is recommended that methylxanthines and methylxanthine-containing products be stopped 24 hours prior to pharmacological stress tests. Methylxanthines appear more likely to interfere with dipyridamole (Persantine) than adenosine-induced stress testing.

Disulfiram (Antabuse)

  1. Green coffee contains caffeine. Concomitant use can increase caffeine serum concentrations, and the risk of adverse effects. Disulfiram decreases the rate of caffeine clearance in humans.

Ephedrine

  1. Use of ephedrine with green coffee can increase the risk of stimulatory adverse effects of caffeine. There is evidence that using ephedrine with caffeine might increase the risk of serious life-threatening or debilitating adverse effects such as hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke, seizures, and death (anecdotal evidence).
  2. Avoid taking green coffee with ephedrine and other stimulants.

Estrogens

  1. Theoretically, concomitant use might increase serum caffeine concentrations and the risk of adverse effects, due to the caffeine contained in green coffee. Estrogen inhibits caffeine metabolism in humans.

Fluconazole (Diflucan)

  1. Concomitant use might increase the effects of caffeine. Fluconazole decreases caffeine clearance by approximately 25% in humans.

Fluvoxamine (Luvox)

  1. Green coffee contains caffeine. Concomitant use of fluvoxamine can increase caffeine serum concentrations, and the risk of caffeine adverse effects. Fluvoxamine reduces caffeine metabolism in humans.

Lithium

  1. Theoretically, abrupt green coffee withdrawal might increase serum lithium levels, due to the caffeine contained in green coffee. There are two case reports of lithium tremor that worsened upon abrupt coffee withdrawal.

Mexiletine (Mexitil)

  1. Concomitant use might increase the effects and adverse effects of caffeine in green coffee. Mexiletine can decrease caffeine elimination by 50%.

Pentobarbital (Nembutal)

  1. The caffeine in coffee might negate the hypnotic effects of pentobarbital.

Phenylpropanolamine

  1. Concomitant use of phenylpropanolamine and green coffee might cause an additive increase in blood pressure due to the caffeine in green coffee. Phenylpropanolamine also seems to increase caffeine serum levels.

Quinolone Antibiotics

  1. Theoretically, concomitant use might increase serum caffeine concentrations and the risk of adverse effects, due to the caffeine contained in green coffee. Quinolones decrease caffeine clearance.
  2. Quinolones (also referred to as fluoroquinolones) include ciprofloxacin (Cipro), enoxacin (Penetrex), gatifloxacin (Tequin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ofloxacin (Floxin), sparfloxacin (Zagam), and trovafloxacin (Trovan).

Terbinafine (Lamisil)

  1. Theoretically, concomitant use might increase serum caffeine concentrations and the risk of adverse effects, due to the caffeine contained in green coffee. Terbinafine decreases the rate of caffeine clearance in humans.

Theophylline

  1. Theoretically, concomitant use might increase serum theophylline concentrations and the risk of adverse effects, due to the caffeine contained in green coffee. Large amounts of caffeine might inhibit theophylline metabolism.

Should you be supplementing with Green Coffee Bean?

Green coffee bean and green coffee bean extract show promise in helping reduce weight gain and possibly promoting weight loss. If you have untreated hypertension, this supplement may help reduce blood pressure.

Anxiety concerns? Want to lose weight?

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