Colloidal Minerals

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Commercial colloidal mineral products are derived from clay or humic shale deposits. Historically, some Native American tribes have used clay medicinally. There are many different promotional claims for colloidal mineral products, but there is no reliable medical evidence to support using these products.

Colloidal minerals are used orally for the following:

  • As a supplemental source of trace minerals
  • As a dietary supplement to increase energy
  • Improving blood sugar levels in diabetes
  • Arthritis symptoms
  • Reducing blood cell clumping
  • Reversing early cataracts
  • Turning gray hair dark again
  • Flushing poisonous heavy metals from the body
  • Improving general well being
  • Reducing aches and pains

Also known as:  Bioelectrical Minerals, Clay Suspension Products, Colloidal Trace Minerals, Humic Shale, Minerales Coloidales, Minéraux Colloïdaux, Oligo-Éléments Colloïdaux, Plant-Derived Liquid Minerals, Schiste Humique. CAUTION: See separate listing for Clay

Diseases and Conditions

There is insufficient reliable information available about the effectiveness of colloidal minerals on the following:

  • As a supplemental source of trace minerals
  • As a dietary supplement to increase energy
  • Improving blood sugar levels in diabetes
  • Arthritis symptoms
  • Reducing blood cell clumping
  • Reversing early cataracts
  • Turning gray hair dark again
  • Flushing poisonous heavy metals from the body
  • Improving general well being
  • Reducing aches and pains

Safety

Colloidal minerals may be unsafe to take orally because they contain different amounts of arsenic, aluminum, barium, lead, titanium, and nickel; which may cause toxicity. There is insufficient information on the overall safety of colloidal minerals on adults, children, pregnant, and breastfeeding women; best to avoid. No side effects or cases of toxicity have been reported.

Medication Interactions

There are no known medication interactions for colloidal minerals.

Supplement and Food Interactions

There are no known supplement, herb, or food interactions for colloidal minerals.

Dosage

There is insufficient reliable evidence available to determine a dosage for colloidal minerals.

Foods

There is insufficient evidence to determine if colloidal minerals can be found in foods.

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References

  1. https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/references.aspx?productid=409
  2. http://naturaldatabase.therapeuticresearch.com/nd/Search.aspx?pt=100&id=409&fs=ND&searchid=61668698&cs=&s=ND

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